It appears that the Republican controlled Congress and the Trump Administration cannot get anything done on the contentious issues of immigration.

Right now, a slight bi-partisan majority in the Senate wants to provide a pathway to citizenship for young people brought to the US illegally as children (the so-called Dreamers) and will provide $25 billion for border security or a border wall.  Because it lacks other measures President Trump views as critical, the Trump Administration lobbied against this bill, resulting in its failure with only 54 of the 60 votes needed to pass.

Meanwhile, in the House of Representatives, Paul Ryan will not bring an amendment to a vote unless it will be signed by President Trump.  President Trump has stated he will not sign a bill unless it meets his “4 Pillars” requirement: a path to citizenship for Dreamers, billions to fund a border wall and other border security measures, limitations on legal family-based immigration, and elimination of the Diversity Visa Lottery program.  A bill sponsored by Republicans John Cornyn and Chuck Grassley, which mirrors President Trump’s 4 Pillars, was brought to vote and failed 39 to 60.

Continue Reading Immigration Issues on Capitol Hill – Will Anything Get Done?

The Supreme Court will hear the Obama administration’s appeal of the 5th Circuit Court’s decision to uphold the nationwide injunction of the expansion of Deferred Action for Children (DACA) and implementation of Deferred Action for Parents of Americans (DAPA) set by federal Judge Andrew Hanen in Texas.

In addition to the procedural issues of comment and potential harm discussed in the lower courts, the Supreme Court asked both, “the federal government and the states suing it to address whether the executive actions on immigration violate the Constitution’s take care clause — an issue that was not definitively decided by lower courts that have ruled on the case.”

On Tuesday, December 1, the U.S. Supreme Court handed the Obama administration a “small procedural vactory” and refused the request of Texas and other states for a 30-day extension to file briefs in support of the lawsuit blocking the Obama administration’s immigration executive action on DACA and DAPA. Instead, the Court accepted the Justice Department’s eight day extension request. The Supreme Court will likely decide in January whether or not to hear the case this term. If the Supreme Court hears the case during the current term, the decision would likely be published in June, providing quite the fan-flaming event during the 2016 presidential election.

Continue Reading Supreme Court Rejects States’ Request for 30 Day Filing Extension on DACA, DAPA