Effective immediately, United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will resume premium processing for select cap-exempt H-1B petitions. Cap-exempt petitioners who are eligible for premium processing can file Form I-907, Request for Premium Processing Service, along with the filing fee of $1,225.  

Such petitioners include: 

  • An institution of higher education;
  • A nonprofit related to or affiliated with an institution of higher education; and
  • A nonprofit research or governmental research organization.

Premium processing will also resume for petitions where the beneficiary will be employed at a qualifying cap-exempt institution, organization or entity. 

USCIS will make future additional announcements regarding resuming the premium processing for additional H-1B petitions. Please contact your Mintz Levin immigration attorney with any questions.

This is a follow-up to the Supreme Court’s decision on June 26, 2017 which allowed the Trump Administration’s Travel Ban affecting nationals of the six designated Muslim-majority countries to be partially implemented until its hearing on the merits in the fall. The Supreme Court specifically exempted people with a “bona fide connection” to a person or entity in the United States.

As we reported on July 17, 2017, the U.S. Department of State interpreted this exemption to be applicable to only “close relatives,” limiting it to parents, spouses, fiancés, sons or daughters, siblings, sons-in-law, and daughters-in-law, and excluding resettlement organizations as qualifying U.S. entities for refugees. The U.S. District Court for the District of Hawaii then ruled that additional relatives in the U.S. and refugees accepted by resettlement organizations in the U.S. could qualify for purposes of this exemption from the ban. The Justice Department immediately appealed this decision. The Trump Administration asked the Supreme Court to clarify its June 26th decision. On July 19th, in a one-paragraph ruling, the Supreme Court refused to clarify its prior decision, but it allowed the Hawaii court decision expanding the categories of relatives to stand, pending the appeal of this decision by the Trump Administration to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. The additional qualifying relative relationships include grandparents, grandchildren, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, and cousins.

However, the Supreme Court stayed the lower court’s decision regarding refugees. Accordingly, at this time the relationship between a refugee and a sponsoring agency is not sufficient to overcome the travel ban, and only refugees with qualifying family relationships will be able to overcome the ban. This currently affects approximately 24,000 waiting refugees.

This issue continues to evolve, and we will continue to provide updates following breaking developments.

Effective upon publication by the Federal Register on Wednesday, July 19, 2017, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has authorized the one-time issuance of an additional 15,000 H-2B visas for Temporary Nonagricultural Workers through September 30, 2017. The annual H-2B cap, previously set by Congress at 66,000, had come under fire as being woefully deficient to help American businesses meet their temporary seasonal or short-term surge employment needs. This would include “seasonal workers” such as hotel maids or restaurant workers at summer resort areas such as Cape Cod or the Hamptons. For FY 2017, which expires on September 30, 2017, USCIS received sufficient H-2B petitions to meet the full statutory cap of 66,000 visas on March 13, 2017. In response to numerous reports of such businesses suffering substantial economic hardship due to labor shortages, USCIS, with Department of Labor assistance, is implementing this one-time increase in H-2B visas.

Working with the Secretary of Labor, Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly authorized the issuance of an additional 15,000 H-2B visas for the remainder of FY 2017 to be given to U.S. businesses that would “suffer irreparable harm” because of the lack of available temporary nonagricultural workers. To qualify for these additional visas, U.S. employers must attest to, under the pains and penalties of perjury, that their business “is likely to suffer irreparable harm if it cannot employ H-2B nonimmigrant workers through September 30, 2017.”

We would usually cheer when we hear that an additional 15,000 temporary work visas will become available in a given fiscal year. But how helpful will these additional visas be to eliminate the current shortage of H-2B nonagricultural workers in FY 2017?

  • A portion of the businesses that have been complaining about the shortage of H-2B visas consists of businesses that thrive during the summer season in resort areas or by the shore. The summer season will be over in little more than a month. In fact, there are children who have to return to school as early as August 10th or 11th. It does not appear that there is sufficient time to process these visas to help any businesses that are tied to the “summer season.”
  • Similarly, FY 2017 will be ending September 30, 2017, approximately 2 ½ months from now. H-2B petitions require an approved mini labor certification demonstrating the unavailability of U.S. workers for the subject position(s). Given this time frame, is it worthwhile to sponsor an H-2B worker for the short time remaining? 

How many companies will actually be eligible for these additional visas if the U.S. employer must attest to and demonstrate “irreparable harm” to their business if they cannot employ H-2B workers in FY 2017?

  • Does “irreparable harm” mean that the U.S. employer must demonstrate that his/her business will be forced to close if H-2B workers cannot be employed during FY2017? Or does it mean that revenues will suffer?

Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly still has to provide more information as to the eligibility criteria for these visas. Is this another example of providing “too little, too late”?

On July 17, 2017, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) published another revised version of Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification. It will be mandatory for employers to use this new version of the form commencing September 18, 2017. Until September 18, employers may use either the new version I-9 with a revision date of 07/17/17 or the prior edition, which has a revision date of 11/14/16.

Although there are no revisions to the fillable portions of the form, there are changes to the Instructions to Form I-9 and the List of Acceptable Documents on Form I-9, specifically:

  • The I-9 Instructions reflect the name change of the Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair Employment Practices to its new name, Immigrant and Employee Rights Section.
  • The new form removes “the end of” from the phrase “the end of the first day of employment” in the instructions part for completion of Section 1.
  • The Consular Report of Birth Abroad (Form FS-240) was added as a List C acceptable document. Employers completing Form I-9 on a computer will be able to select Form FS-240 from the drop-down menus available in List C of Sections 2 and 3. E-Verify users will also be able to select Form FS-240 when creating a case for an employee who has presented this document for Form I-9.
  • In addition, the List of Acceptable Documents combines all of the certifications of report of birth issued by the Department of State (Form FS-545, Form DS-1350, and Form FS-240) into selection C #2 in List C (instead of being listed separately as #2 for Form FS-545 and #3 for Form DS-1350 on the prior version of the list).
  • Due to the above changes, please note that items were renumbered. For example, the employment authorization document issued by the Department of Homeland Security on List C changed from List C #8 to List C #7. The SSN card remained the same number as it continues to be the first item on List C.

Moreover, all of these changes were also made in the revised Handbook for Employers: Guidance for Completing Form I-9 (M-274). Thus, a new edition of the Handbook is available and it promises to be easier for users to navigate.

To see USCIS’s news release regarding its Form I-9 update, please visit its website. Mintz Levin’s attorneys stand ready to assist our clients with any questions regarding the new Form I-9

The U.S. and worldwide entrepreneur community had been looking forward to July 17th with great anticipation.  This was supposed to be the effective date of the new International Entrepreneur Parole immigration regulation.  This refreshing and innovative immigration option for foreign entrepreneurs would solve an enormous problem in the U.S. immigration system: the non-existence of a visa for start-ups founded by or being driven by talented foreign nationals.  Yet on July 11, 2017 the Department of Homeland Security published a notice in the Federal Register seeking comments on its desire to rescind the rule.

This entrepreneur parole process would not have been a cakewalk for applicants:  only those who could meet the stringent requirements associated with it would be able qualify (to be approved, entrepreneurs would have to own at least 10% of the enterprise and would have to have raised significant capital from established U.S. investors or government grants).  Applications would be very strictly reviewed, and only applicants who clearly qualified and passed required government background checks would be approved for this temporary status.

Yet despite the strict criteria, the entrepreneur community was delighted that the U.S. government (during the Obama administration) had finally rolled out an immigration solution to the enormous talent crisis facing the U.S. technology sector.

The technology industry is fueled in large part by immigration.  As of January, 2016 immigrants had started more than half (44 of 87) of America’s start-up companies valued at $1 billion dollars or more and are key members of management or product development teams in over 70 percent (62 or 87) of these companies.* Immigrants play vital roles in the technology industry in job creation, innovation and leadership.

Continue Reading Opportunity Foreclosed: The International Entrepreneur Parole Rule May Die Before it Gets Out of the Gate

On June 26, 2017, US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) introduced a redesigned version of Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status. This form is used in the final stage of the permanent residence, or “green card,” process for most applicants physically present in the United States.

There is a 60-day grace period during which USCIS will accept either the new version or the older version of the form, which bears an edition date of 01/17/17. Beginning August 25, 2017, however, only the new form, bearing an edition date of 06/26/2017, will be accepted.

To read our full alert, click here.

On Monday, June 26th, the U.S. Supreme Court (SCOTUS) issued a mixed decision in the “Travel Ban” litigation, relating to Presidential Executive Order 13780 (“EO”). As explained in more detail below, the SCOTUS decision gave a partial victory to the respondents who had challenged the EO while at the same time upholding the travel ban and related provisions for certain foreign nationals who cannot demonstrate a sufficient nexus to a family member, employer, educational institution or other entity in the U.S.

The Supreme Court granted certiorari and consolidated the two federal court cases from the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals and the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals. It will hear arguments in the consolidated case in the Court’s October, 2017 term.

To read our full alert, click here.

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled unanimously that naturalized American citizens cannot be stripped of citizenship if a lie or omission in the application process was irrelevant to the government’s decision to approve the naturalization application in the first place. The ruling in Maslenjak vs. U.S. will ultimately make it more difficult for the government to revoke citizenship, rejecting both the current and prior administrations’ position that all lies–even minor ones–can lead to loss of citizenship.

The case involved an ethnic Serb who lied about her husband’s military service during her refugee processing, obscuring his service in the Bosnian Serb Army. When later applying for naturalization, she falsely claimed that she had never given false or misleading information when seeking an immigration benefit. Divna Maslenjak arrived in the U.S. as a refugee in 2000 and became a citizen in 2007. In 2013, however, she admitted that her husband had indeed served in the Bosnian Serb Army, ultimately resulting in her conviction for making false statements on her application for naturalization, and eventually revocation of her U.S. citizenship for having been obtained “contrary to law.”

Maslenjak appealed, contending that, when the underlying offense in a citizenship revocation case is a false statement, the government must prove that the truth would have negatively influenced the original decision. The Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals disagreed, ruling that the government need not establish that Maslenjak’s misrepresentations were material to the original naturalization decision.

On June 22, the Supreme Court overturned the Sixth Circuit’s decision, focusing on the causal relationship between the violation and the acquisition of citizenship. The Court was particularly troubled that the government’s position results in a “mismatch between the requirements for naturalization on the one hand and those for denaturalization on the other” and the uncertainty this mismatch imposes on naturalized U.S. citizens.

The case will now return to the lower courts. Maslenjak’s U.S. citizenship could remain revoked, but only if the lower court determines that her false statements were in fact material to the approval of her naturalization application.

This ruling significantly raises the bar for revocation of citizenship. Requiring the government to show that it would have denied a citizenship application had it known the truth will make it more difficult for citizenship to be revoked. Even if the naturalized citizen’s lie had a real potential to affect the naturalization decision, the government will have to demonstrate not only that the lie could have impacted the decision, but that it actually would have made a difference. By disallowing revocation based on factors that might not have resulted in denial in the first instance, the Court provides naturalized U.S. citizens much greater security in their new status.

On May 31st, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) announced that they have published a new update on the I-94 website. CBP will remind travelers via e-mail of their officially recorded departure date from the United States. Currently, CBP will send these reminders to eligible travelers on the visa waiver program. CBP expects to further update the I-94 website to incorporate similar alerts for additional non-immigrant travelers. If the traveler has overstayed the terms of their admission, the I-94 website will provide information regarding the next steps to take. To read our full alert, click here.

On May 24th, DHS Secretary John F. Kelly extended Temporary Protected Status (TPS) through January 22, 2018 for eligible nationals of Haiti and individuals without nationality who last habitually resided in Haiti. The Secretary concluded that although Haiti has made significant progress in recovering from the January 2010 earthquake that prompted the initial TPS designation, conditions in Haiti supporting its designation continue to be met at this time. Haiti’s poor conditions have been further exacerbated by a cholera epidemic in October 2010 and Hurricane Matthew in October 2016. While the six-month extension is much needed, it is unlikely that the crises in Haiti that justified the continued designations will be resolved by January 2018. At least 60 days before January 22, 2018, Secretary Kelly will reevaluate the designation for Haiti and determine whether another extension of the current designation, a redesignation, or a termination is warranted. Typically, TPS is extended for 18 months at a time.

Current beneficiaries of Haiti’s TPS designation seeking to extend their TPS must re-register by July 24, 2017. TPS beneficiaries who re-register may request a new Employment Authorization Document (EAD). Those who re-register and request a new EAD during the 60-day re-registration period will receive an automatic extension of their expiring EAD for up to 180 days from the date their current EAD expires. Current EADs will not be automatically extended without a new EAD request. TPS beneficiaries are strongly encouraged to re-register and file their EAD applications as early as possible to avoid lapses in documentation of employment authorization.

Continue Reading TPS Extended for Haitians and Court of Appeals Upholds the Block of Second Travel Ban